IFA PRESIDENT VOLUNTEERS AT THE FIS NORDIC WORLD SKI CHAMPIONSHIPS

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IFA PRESIDENT VOLUNTEERS AT THE FIS NORDIC WORLD SKI CHAMPIONSHIPS IN OBERSTDORF/Germany

22.02.2021, Deutschland, Oberstdorf, FIS Nordische Ski Weltmeisterschaften 2021, Ski nordisch, Nordische Ski WM 2021, Wintersport, NWM – Helfer – Team – Jörn Verleger – Anti-Doping – aus Grünwald

Currently the German city Oberstdorf is the centre of nordic wintersports. During twelve days the world champions in ski jumping, cross-country skiing and Nordic combined will be crowned at the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships. And as part of the 1400 volunteers and very close to the athletes is IFA President Jörn Verleger. As one of the nearby 40 anti-doping chaperone he becomes the shadow of the cross-country skiers as soon as they cross the finish line. The French word translates as supervisor.

The 48-year-old was on duty as a volunteer in the cross-country stadium during the first week of the World Championships and accompanies the athletes until the doping control. “In the process, I first inform the athlete about the upcoming control and do not let him out of my sight afterwards,” says Verleger. This is to guarantee that the “chosen ones” go for a doping test without delay.

“We all want the sport to stay clean,” says the German, who is also enganged as Anti-Doping Administrator in other IFs like the World Flying Disc Federation (WFDF). The fight against doping is not just about the tests, he says; prevention and education are at the forefront of the volunteer’s mind. “These aspects actually count for me even more than the pure controls,” says Verleger, who has taken holiday for his volunteer job. For Verleger, who was already on duty at the last Nordic World Ski Championships in Oberstdorf in 2005, there is no better task.

Fistball and winter sports – for Verleger this is not a contradiction. “Sport defines my life,” says Verleger. With a view to the two IFA Fistball World Championships coming up this year in Austria and Switzerland, the hygiene concept of the World Ski Championships is also interesting to him.

“There’s always a lot you can learn and adapt from these kinds of major events,” says Verleger. In general, he does not find the circumstances burdensome. “Tests and the procedure are part of the new normal,” Verleger says. “At the end of the day, I’m glad the event is happening at all.”